Register Today for Our Next Lecture and Receive a 10% Discount

Our next lecture Payroll Lecture Series 102: Multistate Employees: Taxes & Wage Hour Law & Garnishments…Oh My! will be held on Monday, March 30, 2020 from 10 am Pacific to Noon Pacific. This webinar/lecture will cover the difficult areas for compliance when processing payroll for employees who live in one state and work in another or who work in two or more states.  This lecture includes:

  • How to determine state withholding liability
  • Who is a resident
  • How reciprocal agreements affect taxation of wages
  • Resident and nonresident taxation policies
  • The four factor test for state unemployment insurance
  • Income and unemployment taxation of Fringe benefits
  • What wage and hour laws must be followed
  • How to handle income and unemployment insurance taxation for employees working in multiple states
  • How working in multiple states could affect withholding for garnishments
  • Withholding requirements when an employee is in a state temporarily
  • Which states require the use of their own Withholding Allowance Certificate, which states allow either theirs or the Form W-4, and which states don’t have a form
  • Reporting wages for multistate employees on Form W-2

We are an APA approved provider for 2020. This lecture has been submitted to the APA for 2.0 RCHs.  As with all my lectures, my subscribers will receive a 10% discount by using the coupon code EFVMPZC9 at checkout.  But you must register before March 25, 2020 to receive the discount.

The Holidays are Upon Us and for Payroll That Could Mean Taxing Gifts

‘Tis the season for celebrating.  Office holiday parties, year end bonuses and most of all gifts from the company.  Maybe a $25 gift card to help with the holiday dinner or a nice ham or turkey.  The idea of getting something from the boss is a joyous and wonderful idea for most American workers.  But to payroll, the giving of gifts to employees means only one thing, the annual argument over taxation!

The Internal Revenue Code (IRC) requires that any payment made to an employee that is cash or the cash equivalent is taxable wages to the employee.  As stated on the IRS website “Cash or cash equivalent items provided by the employer are never excludable from income… Gift certificates that are redeemable for general merchandise or have a cash equivalent value are not de minimis benefits and are taxable.”

Unfortunately payroll gets to play “The Grinch” when it comes to taxing gift certificates.  But what about an actual ham or turkey or other such item?  Do we have to tax that as well?  On that one we get to play Santa!  No taxation is required on holiday gifts with a low fair market value such as a ham or turkey.

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