Keeping Remote Freelance Workers Accountable

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As attested by Pew Research self-named Generation Y (those born during the 1980s and early 90s) have eclipsed previous generations in regards to workforce involvement. In fact, according to a recent survey  a vast majority of millennials feel that “flexibility and ambition” are closely associated. With 78% of this group more likely to have a full-time spouse/partner working, there’s little surprise that workplace formulation has made a tremendous shift. The upshot is telecommuting. Actually, businesses today are no longer put-off by home based work requests and frequently include work-at-home proposals in HR recruitment plans.

The increase in millennial contemporaries has introduced massive modifications in the way companies manage their staff due to remote employment. The millennial workforce is expanding, proficient, and au fait with the demands of today’s global economies.

The concept of remote workers continues to be an anomaly of sorts, as more convenient options of generating income has yet to sink into the psyche of the masses. To many individuals, the traditional way of working is the only viable means of employment. Questions like, how people get paid, how companies account for workers, and is it serious work are common. Unfortunately, short-sighted suppositions prevent many who could benefit from remote work the opportunity to take advantage of it.

Organization Advantages and Accountability

Consequently, a long-term sophisticated system must be established to consolidate the undertaking and oddities of the digital workforce, as telecommuting is now accepted as the adopted workforce for both large and small companies. As a result, many corporations have devised means of cutting costs in the current world of financial dubiety with access to a worldwide top-notch labor force.

Outsourcing is mutually beneficial for both companies and their remote staff. For example, individuals with physical limitations are able to find work while companies increase production, downsize office space and save on office equipment.

Nevertheless, making remote workers accountable is a sticking point for many corporations. What strategies and blueprints are foolproof enough to ensure that telecommuters are actually on-the-job and not sipping tea while watching the latest reality show?

Keeping Remote Workers Accountable

HR managers, CEOs, and IT folk at both large and small businesses, are hard-pressed to discover a way of guaranteeing that their employed remote workers are actually working. It’s much like maintaining a long distance relationship without the romanticism. What it comes down to is implementing a superb software program. Here are three suggestions on how to keep remote workers accountable.

  1. Consolidate Correspondence

Dissimilar to staff working in an office, remote staff may experience delays in correspondence due to a lack of face-to-face interaction. To clarify the situation, companies should consider arranging several specific communication techniques that coordinate with a virtual program for work at home employees. For instance, some businesses use social computer networks or employee apps like Blink or VeryConnect. These types of networks allow virtual staff to stay connected to other telecommuters who may offer assistance and management throughout the working day.

Another solution for communication issues include using Skype or Google Hangout in case of inaccuracies via chat or email. Of course, the good ole’ 19th century invention called the telephone is still viable in its 21st century incarnation known as a smartphone.

  1. Highlight Clarity

Remote teams require a sophisticated level of management and transparency across every  line of work. In light of this, it is crucial to employ a system that allows access to a telecommuter’s tasks, work hours, pay arrangement (for instance by the hour or by each task), etc. Software systems like Time Doctor offers everything from time tracking and screen shots to web usage, payroll, reporting and more. This type of software tracking system helps employers keep remote workers viable and accountable.

Businesses must keep track of telecommuters working hours and additional vital information to make sure all is aboveboard; therefore, the correct software set-up is vital for companies and their teleworking staff. In addition, companies must make modifications and incorporate accountability into the workflow. Well-organized coordination between employers and remote workers substantially increases productivity according to Remote.Co.

  1. Planning Ahead

Working virtually is not exempt from stumbling blocks. In spite of that, there are a number of reliable methods to contend with the most frequent problems. For example, what if an employee has unreliable Internet? The best solution is to make certain that a potential team member has a stable connection before hiring them. In fact, a secure Internet connection should be a priority for remote workers. In case something does happen, a telecommuter should have access to a Wi-Fi hot-spot nearby. If not, stopping by the office is another option if it’s close by. Doing something is better than doing nothing and letting technical problems get in the way of a day’s work.

In essence, it’s about using common sense ways and means to anticipate difficulties that might arise from using remote workers and making provisions for them.

 Vaishali Badgujar is a digital marketer at Time Doctor, a SaaS time tracking & productivity tool for companies & freelancers. She is an inbound marketing expert & specializes in link building. 

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