4 Ways Payroll Can Boost Employee Satisfaction

During the summer months I take a break from blogging but love it when I have guest bloggers who can provide my followers with interesting information. Today’s guest blogger has some great insight as to how payroll can help employee satisfaction.  Take a read from Sam at Https://indextimeclock.com

How many smiles greet you each morning when you enter the office? Can you honestly say your employees are satisfied and happy to come to work?

Of course everyone would rather be at home relaxing but good management can lead to a high level of employee satisfaction which makes for a smiling team that’s also highly productive. That’s a win for everyone.

But how do you get there?

What Determines Employee Satisfaction?

Will you be surprised to know in many studies compensation rates as the number factor in workers’ satisfaction with their jobs? So you can already see that your payroll department plays a vital role in getting this right. If no salaries are paid you definitely won’t see any smiles around you.

Of course this is a complex situation so there are many factors at play which you have to manage:

  • Being appreciated for work delivered
  • Relationships at the office
  • How the company fares financially (everyone wants to be proud of where they work)
  • Personal development
  • How interesting the work is
  • Feeling safe at work
  • Company values workers can be proud of

But why should you concern yourself with this? Because you don’t want to take the risk of having a high employee turn over rate. When you lose employees to other companies where they do find what they’re looking for you’re risking:

  • High costs to train new employees
  • Struggling to get the quality workers you need to grow your business
  • Gaining a reputation as a company no one wants to work for

But perhaps you’ve tried working on these aspects in your office but they don’t seem to stick. Are you sure you’re working with the root of the problem? Few businesses realize how much the payroll department in your business can affect your employees’ overall experience of their work days.

So let’s help you gauge whether payroll is helping or hindering your business. We’ll also tell you how to get it right from now on.

How Can Payroll Help?

Does Your System Put Them First?

What do you do when you respect someone? Usually it motivates you to put their wishes before your own. At the very least you’ll consider how your actions affect them. How often do you do this with your employees?

A late or wrong salary payment may seem trivial to you but for someone with bills to pay it can turn an ordinary day into a disaster. When you use state of the art payroll systems that rely more on AI and automated features than manual work you’ll see fewer salary glitches.

While you’re showing respect you also prevent a problem. When there are fewer disputes in the office you’ll see relationships will be healthier which will automatically make your group more excited to get to work each day.

Of course new technology requires a monetary investment from your side but this one decision will signal to employees that you have their best interests at heart. That will create loyalty from their side so this benefits you in the long run too.

Do They Feel Appreciated?

This one rates high on the list of factors you need to manage. And saying thank you at the end of each day won’t suffice.

Have you considered some of these tactics?

  • Personal discussions with employees regarding their work, performance reports and development in the company. This signals that you take notice of each individual.
  • Identifying how well someone settles in during an onboarding process. Talking about the challenges someone experiences and mentioning the value he or she already added will keep someone motivated.
  • Suggest personal development options such as training or skills courses. This could be an incentive or a reward for someone who delivers exceptional work.
  • Bonuses paid to individuals who reached certain sales goals.
  • When someone goes through a troubling time you can show compassion and provide some time off. This isn’t something people should take advantage of and your decision should be based on the value the individual provided before the problem came about.

Can you see how many of these processes involve your HR and payroll department? But the only way to keep track of all this information is with state of the art HR management and payroll programs. Digitizing employee files and creating reminders for setting up performance appraisals will ensure you don’t forget a step in the process of looking after employees..

Can You Pay Them More?

Of course all employees want to be paid more. You can’t always give them the salaries they dream of but while everyone gets busy with other tasks it’s the payroll office’s responsibility to ensure salary increases and bonus payments happen according to company policy & promises.

Don’t let this one slip. It sends a message of not caring for your employees which you should prevent at all costs.

Can you help them get it Right?

Many employees are used to being reprimanded for wrong doing. Something that’s not as common is getting help or resources to prevent the mistake in future.

Of course you don’t want to babysit your work force and they should take responsibility for their tasks. But in many situations employees do the best they can and managers should always look for ways to help them be more productive & accurate.

Filling in time sheets is time consuming and on a hectic day it’s probably the last thing your workers have time for. Hastily submitting paperwork often leads to mistakes and it’s understandable that this upsets the HR team & a worker’s manager. But why not make it easier?

Automated procedures with online clock in features such as the products you find on https://advancesystemsinc.com mean your workers don’t have to do any paperwork and all data will be accurate. With fewer misunderstandings and reprimands your workers are bound to feel more content coming to work.

At the same time you’re communicating company values such as accuracy, punctuality and excellence. Help them act according to these traits so they can be proud of what they achieve each day.

Important note: You’re not simply doing this to keep everyone happy. You’ll never again have to pay for work not done and you won’t waste time on salary disputes.

[Conclusion]

Do you see new hope for your company? A healthy—even happy—office environment can be a few adjustments away. Investing time into this outcome will have the long lasting effects you’ve only dreamed of so far. Good luck.

Paycheck Checkup May be Needed

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act made significant changes to the tax law, including increasing the standard deduction, eliminating personal exemptions, increasing the child care tax credit, limiting or discontinuing certain deductions and changing the tax rates and brackets.  While these changes did not affect the 2017 tax returns they will affect the 2018 tax returns filed next year.  For this reason the IRS is continuing to push a “paycheck checkup” for all employees but especially seasonal or part-time employees. To assist employees the IRS unveiled several new features to help people navigate the issues affecting withholding in their paychecks. The effort includes a new series of plain language Tax Tips, a YouTube video series and other special efforts to help people understand the importance of checking their withholding as soon as possible including a withholding calculator.

Employees can use the Withholding Calculator to estimate their 2018 income tax. The Withholding Calculator compares that estimate to the employee’s current tax withholding and can help them decide if they need to change their withholding with their employer.  When using the calculator, it’s helpful to have a completed 2017 tax return available. Employees who need to adjust their withholding will need to submit a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate, to their employer. If an employee needs to adjust their withholding, doing so as quickly as possible means there’s more time for tax withholding to take place evenly during the rest of the year. But waiting until later in the year means there are fewer pay periods to make the tax changes – which could have a bigger impact on each paycheck.

Among the groups who should check their withholding are:

  • Two-income families.
  • People working two or more jobs or who only work for part of the year.
  • People with children who claim credits such as the Child Tax Credit.
  • People with older dependents, including children age 17 or older.
  • People who itemized deductions in 2017.
  • People with high incomes and more complex tax returns.
  • People with large tax refunds or large tax bills for 2017.

CA Adopts ABC Test for Independent Contractors

On Monday, April 30, the California Supreme Court issued a landmark [Dynamex Operations West v. Superior Ct., Cal. Sup. Ct., Dkt. No. S222732, 4/30/18] decision basically stating that the “ABC Test” is to be used when determining whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor for purposes of California wage orders. Previous to this latest decision the court case of S.G. Borello & Sons, Inc. v. Department of Industrial Relations, Cal. Sup. Ct., 769 P.2d 399, 3/23/89) was used to determine employee status. In that case the principal test of an employment relationship was whether the person to whom services were rendered has the right to control the manner and means of accomplishing the result desired. Under Dynamex, the Court embraced a standard that presumes all workers are employees instead of contractors and places the burden on classifying an independent contractor under the ABC test.

For a detailed analysis of this case and how you might have to adjust your hiring decisions, I will refer you to the Labor & Employment Law Blog posted by Timothy Kim for the law firm of Sheppard Mullin.

DOL Issues New Opinion Letters Including Lump Sums

The Federal Department of Labor (DOL) has been issuing a flurry of opinion letters recently.   But even more  amazing, is that one of the opinion letters actually deals with a subject long been a thorn in payroll’s side and one that some of us have waited years for a ruling.  The basic problem is whether or not lump sum payments such as bonuses are the same as normal wages under the law when it comes to withholding for garnishments.  You see many of the states do not think that lump sum payments fall under the Consumer Credit Protection Act or CCPA.  This is the Act, written in 1970, that sets the limits for what can be deducted from an employee’s pay for such garnishments as child support and creditor garnishments.  The DOL is actually in charge of enforcing the Act, but has always been unclear on their position on whether or not lump sum payments are covered under the Act.  This is especially true for child support, as employers may actually be required to report the pending lump sum payment and wait for instructions on withholding, usually for back child support owed to the state.  For example, according the the Office of Child Support Enforcement’s matrix on states and lump sums, Alabama requires 100% of all lump sums.  California states that it is subject to 50% unless the lump sum payment does “not involve earnings”. while Indiana follows the CCPA, So we have tried to look to the DOL to give a definition ruling on this and low and behold, they finally have.

In opinion letter CCPA2018-1NA the DOL has answered numerous questions on what constitutes earnings by discussing 18 different specific examples of common types of lump sum payments that an employer may issue to an employee.  These include commissions, discretionary and non discretionary bonuses, profit sharing, production bonuses, sign-on bonuses, relocation incentive payments and safety awards.

Show Down in Texas Over Sick Leave Looming

After Midnight, On February 16th, the Austin, TX city Council approved an ordinance establishing a paid sick leave requirement.  This requirement applies to all private employers located within the City of Austin.  The Mayor is expected to sign the ordinance.  This will have Austin joining the growing lists of cities and states requiring mandatory sick leave.  But before the City Clerk has even had the chance to verify the approved language and post the finalized ordinance, the state legislature began rumblings that they will take steps to curtail the Austin ordinance in its next session.

The Texas Tribune is reporting that just hours after the bill was passed state Rep. Paul Workman, R-Austin sounded off against the bill, saying the ordinance is “declaring war” on small private businesses.  According to Workman, “It’s not the role of the government to mandate for employers to do this”.   This again is going to come to a show-down between local control of the cities versus control in the state capital.  Something that organizations like the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) have made good use out of to curtail the sick leave movement. We can only stay tuned to see how the show-down plays out in the state legislature.

FBI Warns of Another Phishing Scam Against Employees

The FBI is now warning employers of a possible phishing scam taking place.  This one targets the employees themselves. It focuses on companies that use self-service platforms where employees can view their pay, get duplicates of W-2s and update direct deposit information.  The fraudsters are impersonating the employer’s human resources department and asking employees to update or confirm their personal information via a fake website.  The employee receives a fake email that asks the employee to click on the link provided to log into his self-service account.  The email asks the employee to logon to view a private email from HR, to view changes that have been made to their account, or to confirm that the account is still active.

By clicking on the link and entering their self-service credentials, the employee is actually giving their logon information to the fraudster. The fraudster than can go into the self-service account himself and access all of the information including W-2 and pay stub info.  He can also change the direct deposit information. In order to prevent the victim from from knowing what is going on, the fraudster will also change the email address that the self-service platform uses to send alerts when changes are made.

Payroll and human resources professionals need to be on the lookout for this type of email.  With the new tax bill causing new tax withholding decisions, many employees are making good use of these types of self-service portals.  This will be especially true when the new Form W-4 is issued by the IRS.  Employees will want to make sure they have the proper withholding under the new tax tables.  And it would not be “unusual” for payroll or HR to send out emails during this time-frame.

It is also imperative to practice what the FBI calls “good email hygiene”.  Train your employees to watch for phishing attacks and to also check the actual email address rather than just looking at the display name.  Both these items can be crucial to seeing the attack early, before the damage is done.

The Bad Guys Are Phishing Again!

It appears the bad guys are after our payroll information again.  The IRS, and state tax agencies in Michigan, Colorado, Maryland and Rhode Island are urging all payroll personnel to be wary and to educate themselves about a Form W-2 phishing scam that made victims of hundreds of organizations and thousands of employees in 2017.  I blogged about this last year but it bears repeating with the new W-2 submission deadline looming. Here’s how the scam works: cyber criminals do their homework, identifying chief operating officers, school executives or others in positions of authority. Using a technique known as business email compromise (BEC) or business email spoofing (BES), fraudsters posing as executives send emails to payroll personnel requesting copies of Forms W-2 for all employees. The bad guys are using the information to file fraudulent tax returns, or they are posted for sale on the Dark Net.

The initial email may be a friendly, “hi, are you working today” exchange before the fraudster asked for all W-2 information. In several reported cases, after the fraudsters acquired the workforce information, they immediately follow up that request with a wire transfer. The IRS is hoping that by alerting employers and payroll professionals now it can limit the success of this scam in 2018. They have also created a new process by which employers should report the scams. There are steps the IRS can take to protect employees, but only if the agency is notified immediately by the employers about the theft.

The IRS is also suggesting that employers consider creating a policy to limit the number of employees who have the authority to handle Form W-2 requests and that they require additional verification procedures to validate the actual request before emailing sensitive data such as an employee’s Form W-2.

The IRS has established a special email notification address specifically for employers to report Form W-2 data thefts. Here’s how the Form W-2 scam victims can notify the IRS:

  • Email dataloss@irs.gov to notify the IRS of a Form W-2 data loss and provide contact information as listed below
  • In the subject line, type “W-2 Data Loss” so that the email can be routed properly. Do not attach any employee personal identifiable information data.
  • Include the following:
    • business name
    • business employer identification number (EIN) that is associated with the data loss
    • contact name
    • contact phone number
    • summary of how the data loss occurred
    • volume of employees impacted by the data loss

Businesses and payroll professionals that only receive a suspect email but do not fall victim to the scam should send the full email headers to phishing@irs.gov and use “W-2 Scam” in the subject line. But payroll professionals as well as finance departments should be alert to any unusual request for employee data. Cyber criminals and their scams are constantly evolving.

Tips vs Service Charges: An IRS Reminder

The IRS wants to make sure that employers understand tax ramifications of the various payments that they make to employees or that their employees might receive.  So the IRS has posted a reminder for employers when it comes to tips verses service charges.  The key difference between the two categories affect the taxation for employees as well as the reporting. So-called “automatic gratuities” and any amount imposed on the customer by the employer are service charges, not tips.  Service charges are generally wages, and they are reported to the employee and the IRS in a manner similar to other wages. On the other hand, special rules apply to both employers and employees for reporting tips. Employers should make sure they know the difference and how they report each to the IRS.

What are tips? Tips are discretionary (optional or extra) payments determined by a customer that employees receive from customers. They include:

  • Cash tips received directly from customers.
  • Tips from customers who leave a tip through electronic settlement or payment. This includes a credit card, debit card, gift card, or any other electronic payment method.
  • The value of any noncash tips, such as tickets, or other items of value.
  • Tip amounts received from other employees paid out through tip pools or tip splitting, or other formal or informal tip sharing arrangements.

Four factors are used to determine whether a payment qualifies as a tip. Normally, all four must apply. To be a tip:

  • The payment must be made free from compulsion;
  • The customer must have the unrestricted right to determine the amount;
  • The payment should not be the subject of negotiations or dictated by employer policy; and
  • Generally, the customer has the right to determine who receives the payment.

If any one of these doesn’t apply, the payment is likely a service charge.

What are service charges? Amounts an employer requires a customer to pay are service charges. This is true even if the employer or employee calls the payment a tip or gratuity. Examples of service charges commonly added to a customer’s check include:

  • Large dining party automatic gratuity
  • Banquet event fee
  • Cruise trip package fee
  • Hotel room service charge
  • Bottle service charge (nightclubs, restaurants)

Generally, service charges are reported as non-tip wages paid to the employee. Some employers keep a portion of the service charges. Only the amounts distributed to employees are non-tip wages to those employees.

All cash tips and noncash tips should be included in an employee’s gross income and subject to federal income taxes.ployers are required to retain employee tip reports, withhold income taxes and the employee share of Social Security and Medicare taxes from the wages paid, and withhold income taxes and the employee share of Social Security and Medicare taxes on reported tips from wages (other than tips) or from other funds provided by the employee. In addition, employers are required to pay the employer share of Social Security and Medicare taxes based on the total wages paid to tipped employees as well as the reported tip income.  Employers must report income tax and Social Security and Medicare taxes withheld from their employees’ wages, along with the employer share of Social Security and Medicare taxes, on Form 941, Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return, and deposit these taxes in accordance with federal tax deposit requirements.Tips reported to the employer by the employee must be included in Box 1 (Wages, tips, other compensation), Box 5 (Medicare wages and tips), and Box 7 (Social Security tips) of the employee’s Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement. Enter the amount of any uncollected social security tax and Medicare tax in Box 12 of Form W-2. See the General Instructions for Forms W-2 and W-3.

Reporting Service Charges: Employers who distribute service charges to employees should treat them the same as regular wages for tax withholding and filing requirements, as provided in Publication 15, Employer’s Tax Guide. Distributed service charges must be included in Box 1 (Wages, tips, other compensation), Box 3 (Social Security wages), and Box 5 (Medicare wages and tips) of the employee’s Form W-2.

Keep up to date with the latest from the IRS on taxation by subscribing to Payroll 24/7 today.

IRS Looking for Comments on Form 941 Series…Got Any?

Every so often the IRS solicits comments on its various forms. This is an excellent opportunity for payroll professionals to get their two cents in on the forms they must deal with on a regular or sometimes irregular basis.  This time, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Forms 941 (Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return), 941-PR (Planilla Para La Declaracion Trimestral Del Patrono-LaContribucion Federal Al Seguro Social Y Al Seguro Medicare), 941-SS (Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return-American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands), 941-X, Adjusted Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return or Claim for Refund, 941-X(PR), Ajuste a la Declaracion Federal Trimestral del Patrono o Reclamacion de Reembolso, Schedule R, Allocation Schedule for Aggregated Form 941 Filers, Schedule B (Form 941) (Employer’s Record of Federal Tax Liability), Schedule B (Form 941-PR) (Registro Suplementario De La Obligacion Contributiva Federal Del Patrono), and Form 8974 Qualified Small Business Payroll Tax Credit for Increasing Research Activities.

What about the Form 941 or any of the series do you find difficult, needs better explanations, could be revamped or should just be left as is?  Now is the time to speak up.

Written comments should be received on or before July 7, 2017 to be assured of consideration, and should be directed to Laurie Brimmer, Internal Revenue Service, room 6526, 1111 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20224. Requests for additional information or copies of the form and instructions should be directed to Ralph Terry, at Internal Revenue Service, room 6526, 1111 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20224, or through the internet at Ralph.M.Terry@irs.gov.

 

Keep track of all the latest changes to IRS forms by subscribing to Payroll 24/7 today!

In Case You Hadn’t Notice–It’s Election Time Again

The election is coming up fast.  What that means to most employees and employers is questions. Employees might ask themselves “when should I vote?”.  But they might ask their employers “can I have time off to vote?”. Allowing time off to vote is a company policy question in some cases, but other times it is a question of wage and hour law.  Does an employer have to give the employee time off to vote during working hours?  And if they do, is it paid time off?   There actually is no federal law on whether or not an employee must have time off to vote. It is left up to the states to decide.

Vote campaign

And each state has their own rules.  Some states give up to four hours, where other states don’t address the issue at all.  To assist payroll professionals on this topic I have put together a white paper on the voting time off requirements for the states.  The link is below.  The info was compiled through Thomson Reuters. It should prove helpful as it also give the citation to state law.  I have also listed the states that do not address this issue.  I hope you find it useful.

white-paper-time-off-to-vote-oct-2016

 

 

Subscribe to The Payroll Pause for all the latest news and information pertinent to payroll professionals.  Only $149 per year.