Paycheck Checkup May be Needed

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act made significant changes to the tax law, including increasing the standard deduction, eliminating personal exemptions, increasing the child care tax credit, limiting or discontinuing certain deductions and changing the tax rates and brackets.  While these changes did not affect the 2017 tax returns they will affect the 2018 tax returns filed next year.  For this reason the IRS is continuing to push a “paycheck checkup” for all employees but especially seasonal or part-time employees. To assist employees the IRS unveiled several new features to help people navigate the issues affecting withholding in their paychecks. The effort includes a new series of plain language Tax Tips, a YouTube video series and other special efforts to help people understand the importance of checking their withholding as soon as possible including a withholding calculator.

Employees can use the Withholding Calculator to estimate their 2018 income tax. The Withholding Calculator compares that estimate to the employee’s current tax withholding and can help them decide if they need to change their withholding with their employer.  When using the calculator, it’s helpful to have a completed 2017 tax return available. Employees who need to adjust their withholding will need to submit a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate, to their employer. If an employee needs to adjust their withholding, doing so as quickly as possible means there’s more time for tax withholding to take place evenly during the rest of the year. But waiting until later in the year means there are fewer pay periods to make the tax changes – which could have a bigger impact on each paycheck.

Among the groups who should check their withholding are:

  • Two-income families.
  • People working two or more jobs or who only work for part of the year.
  • People with children who claim credits such as the Child Tax Credit.
  • People with older dependents, including children age 17 or older.
  • People who itemized deductions in 2017.
  • People with high incomes and more complex tax returns.
  • People with large tax refunds or large tax bills for 2017.

CA Adopts ABC Test for Independent Contractors

On Monday, April 30, the California Supreme Court issued a landmark [Dynamex Operations West v. Superior Ct., Cal. Sup. Ct., Dkt. No. S222732, 4/30/18] decision basically stating that the “ABC Test” is to be used when determining whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor for purposes of California wage orders. Previous to this latest decision the court case of S.G. Borello & Sons, Inc. v. Department of Industrial Relations, Cal. Sup. Ct., 769 P.2d 399, 3/23/89) was used to determine employee status. In that case the principal test of an employment relationship was whether the person to whom services were rendered has the right to control the manner and means of accomplishing the result desired. Under Dynamex, the Court embraced a standard that presumes all workers are employees instead of contractors and places the burden on classifying an independent contractor under the ABC test.

For a detailed analysis of this case and how you might have to adjust your hiring decisions, I will refer you to the Labor & Employment Law Blog posted by Timothy Kim for the law firm of Sheppard Mullin.

FLSA Video Training Has Arrived at DOL/WHD

The Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) is launching a new series of brief, plain-language videos to help employers understand their legal obligations when it comes to calculating overtime etc.  According the the WHD website these videos “strip away the legalese and provide employers with basic information…”  The topics provided so far are:

  • Coverage: Does the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) apply to my business?
  • Minimum Wage: What minimum wage requirements apply to my business?
  • Deductions: Can I charge my employees for uniforms or other business expenses?
  • Hours Worked: Do I have to Pay for that time?
  • Overtime: When do I owe overtime compensation and how do I pay it correctly?

The videos are very well done and cover the rules quite nicely.  For example the overtime video does go into all the calculations needed for regular rate of pay.  They last an average of seven or eight minutes each. If you are looking for a good basic training on these topics listed check out the videos from WHD.

WHD Launches PAID Program

Paid Logo

The Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the U.S. Department of Labor has launched a new nationwide pilot program, the Payroll Audit Independent Determination (PAID) program. According to the WHD, PAID facilitates resolution of potential overtime and minimum wage violations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The program’s primary objectives are to resolve such claims expeditiously and without litigation, to improve employers’ compliance with overtime and minimum wage obligations, and to ensure that more employees receive the back wages they are owed—faster.

Under the PAID program, employers are encouraged to conduct audits and, if they discover overtime or minimum wage violations, to self-report those violations. Employers may then work in good faith with WHD to correct their mistakes and to quickly provide 100% of the back wages due to their affected employees.

WHD is implementing this self-audit pilot program nationwide for approximately six months. At the end of the pilot period, WHD will evaluate the effectiveness of the pilot program, potential modifications to the program, and whether to make the program permanent.

However there are potential pitfalls to the new program.  The Blog Wage & Hour Insights, which I feature quite often in my blogs, has an excellent post by Staci Ketay Rotman, Bill Pokorny and Erin Fowler on this very subject that I encourage you to read to get a better understanding of this new program.

The Bad Guys Are Phishing Again!

It appears the bad guys are after our payroll information again.  The IRS, and state tax agencies in Michigan, Colorado, Maryland and Rhode Island are urging all payroll personnel to be wary and to educate themselves about a Form W-2 phishing scam that made victims of hundreds of organizations and thousands of employees in 2017.  I blogged about this last year but it bears repeating with the new W-2 submission deadline looming. Here’s how the scam works: cyber criminals do their homework, identifying chief operating officers, school executives or others in positions of authority. Using a technique known as business email compromise (BEC) or business email spoofing (BES), fraudsters posing as executives send emails to payroll personnel requesting copies of Forms W-2 for all employees. The bad guys are using the information to file fraudulent tax returns, or they are posted for sale on the Dark Net.

The initial email may be a friendly, “hi, are you working today” exchange before the fraudster asked for all W-2 information. In several reported cases, after the fraudsters acquired the workforce information, they immediately follow up that request with a wire transfer. The IRS is hoping that by alerting employers and payroll professionals now it can limit the success of this scam in 2018. They have also created a new process by which employers should report the scams. There are steps the IRS can take to protect employees, but only if the agency is notified immediately by the employers about the theft.

The IRS is also suggesting that employers consider creating a policy to limit the number of employees who have the authority to handle Form W-2 requests and that they require additional verification procedures to validate the actual request before emailing sensitive data such as an employee’s Form W-2.

The IRS has established a special email notification address specifically for employers to report Form W-2 data thefts. Here’s how the Form W-2 scam victims can notify the IRS:

  • Email dataloss@irs.gov to notify the IRS of a Form W-2 data loss and provide contact information as listed below
  • In the subject line, type “W-2 Data Loss” so that the email can be routed properly. Do not attach any employee personal identifiable information data.
  • Include the following:
    • business name
    • business employer identification number (EIN) that is associated with the data loss
    • contact name
    • contact phone number
    • summary of how the data loss occurred
    • volume of employees impacted by the data loss

Businesses and payroll professionals that only receive a suspect email but do not fall victim to the scam should send the full email headers to phishing@irs.gov and use “W-2 Scam” in the subject line. But payroll professionals as well as finance departments should be alert to any unusual request for employee data. Cyber criminals and their scams are constantly evolving.

Jane Fonda is Not Wrong on Tip Regulations

As some of you may have seen on Facebook, a new video with Jane Fonda has been making the rounds. It concerns the latest Department of Labor proposed rules concerning employer treatment of tips.  Leaving the politics of Jane Fonda aside this is an important issue that needs to be understood.  A great source to understand this issue is the latest post from Wage & Hour Insights written by Bill Pokomy on December 8th.  I highly recommend you review his analysis of the proposed rule.

Not All IRS Guidance is as Good as Gold

Nina Olson is with the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS).  This is an independent organization within the IRS that assists taxpayers who are experiencing “troubles” with the IRS in getting issued resolve through the “normal channels”. During recent congressional hearing she was asked what seemed like simple questions concerning the types of IRS guidance taxpayers can rely on.  But the answer was not simple.  She has written a blog; IRS Frequently Asked Questions Can be a Trap for the Unwary on July 26, 2017, that contains excellent information for those of us who need to research tax questions and rely on tax guidance from the IRS.  I recommend reading it to ensure you know what you can and cannot rely on when researching the IRS website for tax guidance.

Does Time and A Half Pay Count Towards Overtime?

When conducting my webinars on the FLSA requirements one area always seems confusing to attendees and that is the eight types of payments that can be excluded when calculating regular rate of pay.  The one found most often to be confusing to my attendees and maybe to you as well is the one that is for bona fide overtime premiums. Bill Pokorny has done an excellent blog post on this subject that I know you will find helpful on this topic. Please take the time to check it out if you offer this type of payment or to improve your general payroll knowledge.

Opinion Letters Are Back at DOL!

The Department of Labor (DOL) has just announced that they will reinstate the issuance of opinion letters. The action allows the department’s Wage and Hour Division to use opinion letters as one of its methods for providing guidance to covered employers and employees. An opinion letter is an official, written opinion by the Wage and Hour Division of how a particular law applies in specific circumstances presented by an employer, employee or other entity requesting the opinion. The letters were a division practice for more than 70 years until being stopped and replaced by general guidance in 2010.

“Reinstating opinion letters will benefit employees and employers as they provide a means by which both can develop a clearer understanding of the Fair Labor Standards Act and other statutes,” said Secretary Acosta. “The U.S. Department of Labor is committed to helping employers and employees clearly understand their labor responsibilities so employers can concentrate on doing what they do best: growing their businesses and creating jobs.”

The division has established a web page where the public can see if existing agency guidance already addresses their questions or submit a request for an opinion letter. The web page explains what to include in the request, where to submit the request, and where to review existing guidance. The division will exercise discretion in determining which requests for opinion letters will be responded to, and the appropriate form of guidance to be issued.

Court Case on CA’s Day of Rest…Finally Rested

California has long had a day of rest requirement.  In fact it has existed long before overtime and minimum wage. It guarantees an employee “one day’s rest therefrom in seven”.  But  which employees and what exactly is one day in seven?  This was really never litigated before the current case of Mendoza v. Nordstrom in which the ruling was just handed down on May 8th.  Rather than my trying to explain the entire court case in a blog, I will, instead, urge you to read the recap of the case as presented by Sheppart Mullin Richter & Hampton’s Brian S. Fong for the Mondaq News Update Service. It is an in-depth look at the ruling and the impact on employers.

 

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